Category: Quilting

Roseville Album block 7 « Ann Champion’s Blog

Block #7 is finished.  I made a couple of little changes.
I placed a piece of fabric behind the basket weaving, and behind the reverse applique in the large flowers.
I  added a couple of circles to the design too. I wanted to get a touch of blue in the block. They’re at the base of the 3 leaves and the base of the large flower.

To do the basket weave, I marked the position where the strips should be placed on the striped fabric that would show through.  Then I pinned it in place and basted it to the background so it wouldn’t shift. Then I laid my strips over the markings, pinning as I went.  I didn’t baste the strips down because I had to maneuver the strips up and down to create the basket weave effect.  Once I had everything in place, I just hand stitched the pieces down.
I use short pins, so I didn’t have much...

Civil War blocks week 10 « Ann Champion’s Blog

We’re at week 10 of Barbara Brackman’s Civil War blocks.  This block is  called Lincoln’s Platform, along with several other names.  Very fitting choice as March 4 is the anniversary of his inaugeration  as President in 1861.
I saw the fabric with Lincoln’s image online and it looked like a nice warm golden tan.  When it arrived it looked pretty green!   I gave Mr. Lincoln a nice hot bath in coffee and it warmed him right up.  ; )
This week’s block was an easy one.
Tags: Barbara Brackman's Civil War blocks, Civil War blocks week 10, Lincoln's Platform 8" block, repro fabrics

London Square « Ann Champion’s Blog

This week the Civil War block that Barbara Brackman posted for us to do is called London Square.
The block represents England’s interest in the War.  As Barbara says..”England was our greatest trading partner and cotton was currency”.  England supported the Confederacy and the cotton growing industry. Cotton was vital to their economy.
I tried to have my colors for this week’s block have a bit of a Confederate feel to them.
 I’m finding some of the blocks that Barbara posts to be very similar to some of the quilts I’ve posted from the cupboard.  This one is very like the Linton I posted last week, and the Cotton Boll block was very much like the Mosaic Tile quilt.  We both posted a log Cabin too.  It shows how blocks have been used throughout quilting’s history, many times with the blocks having several different names....

Civil War Quilt week 9 « Ann Champion’s Blog

This weeks block from Barbara Brackman’s BOW is a Birds In The Air pattern. 
It represents the South and the “birds” fleeing north to be free from  slavery.
It’s an easy block to piece. 
When I laid out the blocks I have so far…it looked like this block should be mostly blue, and preferably a lighter blue?  I also wanted to get some paisley in the quilt because that was such a popular print in the Civil War era.
My friend Barb, from the  Fun With Barb blog recently made a fabulous quilt Remembering Abe.
Go have a look…it’s FANTASTIC!
She very generously sent me some of the fabrics she had left over to use in my Civil War blocks.
Just look at all of those fun stripes and prints! 
I didn’t see a fabric from the group that seemed just right for this week’s block..but I’ll have fun slipping them in along the way.
Thanks...

Little Blue Basket « Ann Champion’s Blog

The block Barbara Brackman posted this week for her Civil War quilt along is a block called Little Blue Basket.
This block represents Missouri.  It recalls the Little Blue River, and the baskets that women used to take provisions to the Guerillas called Bushwhackers along the free state-Kansas and the slave state- Missouri.
The Bushwhackers survived in the bush through aid from their sisters, Mothers and sweethearts who carried baskets full of food to their camps, washed their laundry, and sewed their clothing.
“The Little Blue Basket recalls the women who set out after dusk in the evenings to carrying baskets of food into the woods near the Little Blue River.” 
With a name like “Little Blue Basket” my fabric choice was pretty easy this week.  The block is given without a handle, but shown with a handle as an option. ...

I’ve done a bit of sewing… « Ann Champion’s Blog

Several months ago, Jan of Be*Mused blog posted photos from her trip to the Tokyo Quilt Festival.  She generously posts her photos to Flickr and many of us eagerly await their posting.  Japanese quilts just have something very special about them. 
There was one by Setsuko Inagawa that was really interesting.  Several of us wanted to try our hand at making some of the fun blocks.
Amy, of Badskirt blog drafted the block pattern.  She wrote up a nice tutorial on how to piece it.
Then Laura, of My New Blog Journey decided to post a quilt along for those interested in doing their own version of Setsuko’s quilt.  She started a Flickr group so we could post our blocks and progress.
My quilt ended up quite different from the one that inspired it.  It was fun to piece a block here and there as I felt like it though.  I used a...

machine quilted « Ann Champion’s Blog

I decided to make a play time quilt to go along with the more formal 9 patch one I just made.
The Mother -to- be asked for story books that were signed by the gifter in lieu of cards.  I like that idea, since I’m such a fan of reading to children and love to encourage it.
I remember reading to this Niece when she was little.  It seems like such a short time ago.  Now she’s grown and having a child of her own.  My how time flies!
Anyways…I thought it would be fun to give a story book that incorporated quilting.  I saw one called The Quilt on Amazon.com. 
In the story, the little girl’s blue toy dog gets lost in the folds of the quilt.  That spurred an idea for a play quilt.  I thought it would be fun to make a little quilt with a blue “Sally” dog hidden under a flap of fabric, like the one in the story.
I added pieced...

Japanese x and + finished! « Ann Champion’s Blog

I was able to get the Japanese x and + top quilted!
I basted it on the dining room table by using large binder clamps.  I quilted it by following along the X shaped pieces, quilting in the ditch.  I thought I’d see how it looked once I got that much done and see if it looked like it needed more?
Since the blocks are around 7.5″, just quilting across the quilt in a grid seemed to be enough?
I chose a black and white print for the binding.
You can see a bit of the backing peeking out too.  I used an aqua/white print sheet.  The aqua doesn’t match exact..but it’s a scrappy fun quilt and I think it’s just fine?
I’m happy with how my quilt turned out, even if it’s got just real simple quilting. 
Here’s an “action shot”

Tags: Japanese x and +, machine quilted, scrappy quilt

Japanese x and + « Ann Champion’s Blog

Several months ago, Jan of Be*Mused blog posted photos from her trip to the Tokyo Quilt Festival.  She generously posts her photos to Flickr and many of us eagerly await their posting.  Japanese quilts just have something very special about them. 
There was one by Setsuko Inagawa that was really interesting.  Several of us wanted to try our hand at making some of the fun blocks.
Amy, of Badskirt blog drafted the block pattern.  She wrote up a nice tutorial on how to piece it.
Then Laura, of My New Blog Journey decided to post a quilt along for those interested in doing their own version of Setsuko’s quilt.  She started a Flickr group so we could post our blocks and progress.
My quilt ended up quite different from the one that inspired it.  It was fun to piece a block here and there as I felt like it though.  I used a...

scrappy quilt « Ann Champion’s Blog

Today the quilt top I’m pulling from the quilt top cupboard is a scrappy quilt set with a strip setting.
It dates to the era of 1880-1910. The main fabric that’s used for the setting strips is a double pink. Double pinks are printed with a bright reddish pink with a fine dot or with fine lines to produce a light pink ground. They were then printed with a more concentrated area of the same dark pink. A regular pattern of white dots was often included. Prints identical to the double pinks can be found in golden yellow, purples, and double blues. Double pinks were printed up until the 1920′s and remained pretty much unchanged.

This quilt top contains some pieces that date a bit earlier, but a quilt is normally dated by the newest fabric it contains.
Here you see shirting, a nice antique green, homespun checks, indigo...