Ann Champion’s Blog

At long last…the Princess Feather quilt is done! I started basting it for quilting on March 1..here we are 10 weeks later and it’s complete.

This quilt took quite a bit of time. The applique took 474 hours, the marking and basting 14 hours, the hand quilting 496 hours, and the binding 10.5 hours. A grand total of 994.5 hours.  It measures 93″ x 93″.
The quilting was done with quartered feathered wreaths at each corner of the large blocks and diagonal lines .75″ across the rest of the design. In the center where the 4 blocks meet the wreath is complete, and I stitched around all of the appliqued bits. I couldn’t get the quilting to show up in the pics very well, so I took a pics of the back side in hopes it would show better.

I used a white cotton sateen weave sheet for the back and it quilted like butter. It feels so...

Ann Champion’s Blog

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010
Today the quilt top I’m pulling from the quilt top cupboard is an antique Sunbonnet Sue.
The quilt top dates to 1930-1940′s. It’s hand appliqued with a running stitch in black embroidery floss. I posted another top done in this method last month. These two projects were done by the same quilter and came from an estate sale.
The top has some discoloration which was probably caused by the top being folded and placed in a cedar chest, or stored on a bare wood shelf. A lot of people think it’s OK to store linens in cedar chests for safe keeping, but the wood has acid in it and can cause stains to fabrics. Linens should never touch bare wood.
This discoloration may come out with a soak in Oxyclean? I would never throw an unquilted top in a washing machine, but a soak in the sink would be OK. I...

Ann Champion’s Blog

Today the quilt I’m pulling from the cupboard is an old string quilt. It’s a utility quilt. It was made to be functional and keep someone warm. Scraps of whatever fabrics the maker could find were put into this quilt. It has had hard use.
This quilt dates to 1930′s-1940′s and contains a wide variety of fabrics from that era.

As you can see the borders aren’t even. There is damage to the edges. It appears that at some point someone trimmed the quilt down because the edges were worn to shreds. After the quilt was cut down, the backing was brought around to the front and stitched down to form a binding. There is further wear to the quilt so apparently it was needed and put to use after the repairs?
This quilt has a thick cotton batting and as a result tiny quilting stitches weren’t possible. The maker probably didn’t...

Ann Champion’s Blog

Today I’m pulling a quilt in progress from the quilt top cupboard.
The pattern is an Amish style Square in a Square.  It’s been pin basted and partially marked.  The quilting has been started…but not by me.  This is just how the quilt was when I bought it in August of this year.

I bought this quilt from the same lady I bought the Eagle quilt from.
Here’s the sad part…I’m going to have to take the pins out, and remove the quilting, and redo it.
The marking wasn’t done very well, and a true Amish quilt normally has very precise markings and the quilting is the “star of the show”.

When you look at the quilting that’s been done, you can see that it’s not evenly spaced and the lines aren’t straight.  I wonder if that’s why the quilter stopped working on this quilt?
This quilt will finish at 40″ square.
The other quilt I...

Ann Champion’s Blog

Today the quilt top I’m pulling from the quilt top cupboard is a Tumbling Blocks pattern.
When I got this top it had a lot of damage. I didn’t think to take “before” pics, but I do have a pic of the top with repairs “in progress”.
The maker used bits of flannel here and there, and a couple of very loose weave fabrics, which I didn’t think would hold up.

I started taking the top apart to replace the bad fabrics.  Once I got into it I found a lot more than I thought were bad.

These are scanned photos of during and after the repairs.  They were taken with my old 35mm camera, and are several years old.
As you can see in what is left of the original (on the bed), the maker didn’t pay attention to the placement of lights and darks.  I took apart sections to fix that too.  In the end…I redid the whole top!
I had a few rows...

Ann Champion’s Blog

Today the quilt top I’m pulling from the quilt top cupboard is a Tumbling Blocks pattern.
When I got this top it had a lot of damage. I didn’t think to take “before” pics, but I do have a pic of the top with repairs “in progress”.
The maker used bits of flannel here and there, and a couple of very loose weave fabrics, which I didn’t think would hold up.

I started taking the top apart to replace the bad fabrics.  Once I got into it I found a lot more than I thought were bad.

These are scanned photos of during and after the repairs.  They were taken with my old 35mm camera, and are several years old.
As you can see in what is left of the original (on the bed), the maker didn’t pay attention to the placement of lights and darks.  I took apart sections to fix that too.  In the end…I redid the whole top!
I had a few rows...